This Week in Labor History

UCS—Cornell ILR Labor Daily N. American labor movement’s publisher and distributor of info & ammo for union activists.

  • Today in Labor History: Weekend Edition
    Posted by chrisrolling on January 12, 2018 at 2:00 pm

    January 12 Novelist Jack London is born. His classic definition of a scab—someone who would cross a picket line and take a striker’s job: “After God had finished the rattlesnake, the toad, the vampire, He had some awful substance left with which He made a scab. A scab is a two-legged animal with a cork-screw […]

  • Today in Labor History: January 11
    Posted by chrisrolling on January 11, 2018 at 2:00 pm

    The IWW-organized “Bread & Roses” textile strike of 32,000 women and children begins in Lawrence, Mass. It lasted 10 weeks and ended in victory. The first millworkers to walk out were Polish women, who, upon collecting their pay, exclaimed that they had been cheated and promptly abandoned their looms – 1912 (Notice in the Minneapolis Labor […]

  • Today in Labor History: January 10
    Posted by chrisrolling on January 10, 2018 at 2:00 pm

    In what is described as the worst industrial disaster in state history, the Pemberton Mill in Lawrence, Mass., collapses, trapping 900 workers, mostly Irish women. More than 100 die, scores more injured in the collapse and ensuing fire. Too much machinery had been crammed into the building – 1860 Wobbly organizer and singer Joe Hill […]

  • Today in Labor History: January 9
    Posted by chrisrolling on January 9, 2018 at 2:00 pm

    A Mediation Commission appointed by President Woodrow Wilson finds that “industry’s failure to deal with unions” is the prime reason for labor strife in war industries – 1918 Eighty thousand Chicago construction workers strike – 1922 Southern Tenant Farmers’ Union leads Missouri Highway sit-down of 1,700 families. They had been evicted from their homes so […]

  • Today in Labor History: January 8
    Posted by chrisrolling on January 8, 2018 at 2:00 pm

    The largest slave revolt in U.S. history begins on Louisiana sugar plantations.  Slaves armed with hand tools marched toward New Orleans, setting plantations and crops on fire, building their numbers to an estimated 300-500 as they went.  The uprising lasted for two days before being brutally suppressed by the military – 1811 Birthdate of Mary […]

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